Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Whos is U S P S mailing System

The mail or post is a system for physically transporting documents and other small packages, as well as a term for the postcards, letters, and parcels themselves.[1] A postal service can be private or public, though many governments place restrictions on private systems. Since the mid-19th century national postal systems have generally been established as government monopolies with a fee on the article prepaid. Proof of payment is often in the form of adhesive postage stamps, but postage meters are also used for bulk mailing. Modern private postal systems are typically distinguished from national postal agencies by the names "courier" or "delivery service".

Postal authorities often have functions other than transporting letters. In some countries, a postal, telegraph and telephone (PTT) service oversees the postal system, in addition to telephone and telegraph systems. Some countries' postal systems allow for savings accounts and handle applications for passports.

The economic growth and political stability under the Mauryan empire (322–185 BC) saw the development of impressive civil infrastructure in ancient India. The Mauryans developed early Indian mail service as well as public wells, rest houses, and other facilities for the common public.[7] Common chariots called Dagana were sometimes used as mail chariots in ancient India.[8] Couriers were used militarily by kings and local rulers to deliver information through runners and other carriers. The postmaster, the head of the intelligence service, was responsible for ensuring the maintenance of the courier system. Couriers were also used to deliver personal letters.

Larger envelopes are also sent through the mail. These are often composed of a stronger material than standard envelopes and are often used by businesses to transport documents that may not be folded or damaged, such as legal documents and contracts. Due to their size, larger envelopes are sometimes charged additional postage.

Packages are often sent through some postal services, usually requiring additional postage than an average letter or postcard. Many postal services have limitations as to what a package may or may not contain, usually placing limits or bans on perishable, hazardous or flammable materials. Some hazardous materials in limited quantities may be shipped with appropriate markings and packaging, like an ORM-D label. Additionally, as a result of terrorism concerns, the U.S. Postal Service subjects their packages to numerous security tests, often scanning or x-raying packages for materials that might be found in biological materials or mail bombs.

How to stop Spam mail

Check who it’s from. Spam will almost always come from an unrecognized sender, often with odd email addresses. That doesn’t mean that all unrecognized email is spam. Legitimate newsletters, website administration emails (password resets, authentication requests, etc.), and more may come from addresses you don’t recognize.

Don’t give out your email address online. “Robots” (scripts created to scrape websites for addresses) can quickly gather thousands of emails at a time from websites where the email addresses are made public. Also, sometimes humans actually grab e-mails off websites to use them for sign-up offers in order to get free stuff (iPods, Ringtones, Televisions, etc.).

Make your email address unscannable. If you must provide contact information, try writing it out in creative ways (me [at] yahoo [dot] com). There are alternative ways of displaying your e-mail address while making it hard for spambots to harvest it. Such methods include using image picture of your e-mail address or using JavaScript to dynamically construct the display of your email.

If you fancy joining a directory, BBS or social site, you might want to do a web search of the site for anything looking like e-mail addresses first. If you find loads of addresses, then the site is not secure and you should not give them your information!

If you need to provide an e-mail address to verify an online account and you do not want them to have your real address, you can use name@mailinator.com. You do not need to set up an account at mailinator.com; just check the inbox for whatever name you chose. Be aware that anybody can see the email sent to mailinator.com if they can guess what name you used. Also, mailinator.com only keeps emails for a few hours and automatically strips any attachments.
Avoid clicking links within Wiki essays. A current spam attack involves “essay spammers”, where spammers insert random links to sites related to essay-writing services. Another spam attack is spambots creating random pages related to subjects like UGG Boots. These pages also include random links to other subjects, whether or not they are related to the subject or even placed in a grammatically coherent way.

You could alternatively use https://meandmyid.com which allows you to create infinite, unique, private email addresses. The emails are forwarded to your personal email account so remain private but you can block or delete any addresses which subsequently attract spam.

There are two things you can do to find out if you have a harvesting problem at your e-mail address or website.

If you have a website, open your Contacts page in a browser such as Firefox and then examine the page source. This is usually found under View > Page Source. On the source window, Press Control-F (find) and enter an @ symbol. Press enter. Keep pressing F3 (search again) until you've found all @’s in the code. Make a note of any which look like e-mail addresses. If any are found, contact your website maintainer and insist these websites are protected against spam harvesting.

Search for your email address in Google, or any major search engine. If you find that the source of a listed page has got your address on it, contact the owners of all such pages and get them to remove or protect your address.